upOlivier - le 12 juin 2008 (sometimes behave so strangely)


olivier

- Diana studies sound, how humans perceive sound.  She's a scientist she has a lab but every so often she will also release CDs.

- Right

- These CDs of audio demonstrations that she uses in her research and that’s why we called, because it was in the production of her second CD that she stumbled onto the weirdest phenomenon.

- Well, I'll tell you what happened.  It’s that when you do post-production, as you know, of speech, you loop things (x3) so that you can zero in on Ps - put – put - that sound too loud you need to un-couple Ss – S – S - that sound too sharp and so, and so you put things on loops in order to fine tune the way the speech sounds so I had this particular phrase on a loop and I forgot about it.

- What phrase was this?

- It's a phrase that occurs at the beginning of the CD in which I say: “the sounds as they appear to you are not only different from those that are really present but they sometimes behave so strangely as to seem quite impossible”.  Now, I had the ‘sometimes behave so strangely’ loop: the sounds as they appear to you are not only different from those that are really present but they sometimes behave so strangely, sometimes behave so strangely, just those few words, sometimes behave so strangely, I forget about it, sometimes behave so strangely.

- So here's what happened: Diana leaves her studio, she closes the door, goes into the kitchen to make some tea; all the while this loop is whirring away in the background. As she’s sipping her tea she thinks: is someone singing? who's singing?

- I heard what sounded like song in the background.

- She thinks like, wait a second: that's not singing, that's me! talking!

- That very phrase (so strangely) but at this point (sometimes behave so strangely) it appeared to be sung rather than spoken.

[sometimes behave so strangely]

- This is ‘sometimes behave so strangely’ [with piano]

- Right, yeah! You still hear the words but they are sung words rather than spoken words.


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Updated June 14, 2008